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New Computational Media M.S. and Ph.D. at UC Santa Cruz

UCSC logoComputational Media is all around us — video games, social media, interactive narrative, smartphone apps, computer-generated films, personalized health coaching, and more. To create these kinds of media, to deeply understand them, to push them forward in novel directions, requires a new kind of interdisciplinary thinker and maker. The new graduate degrees in Computational Media at UC Santa Cruz are designed with this person in mind.

The M.S. is designed to help you build on your existing strengths and move into new areas. Maybe you’re a computer scientist or educator who wants to develop a deeper understanding of game design or human-computer interaction. Maybe you’re a storyteller or digital humanist who could explore new territories, but would need deeper technical skills. Maybe you have a background in health care or community organizing and want to find ways to engage the possibilities of computational media to assist and empower people. Maybe you’re already doing interdisciplinary work, but want to develop a deeper understanding of the field and a stronger portfolio.

The Ph.D., on the other hand, is designed for those who are already actively working in computational media and want to develop new knowledge that will change what is possible and how we understand it. Read More »

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Current Game Preservation is Not Enough

This post is a distillation of some current thoughts on game preservation (extending to software preservation) that arose from a presentation I gave at Stanford two weeks ago. Video of that talk is here. The discussion in this post is a little more advanced and focuses mainly on the last 10-15 minutes of the talk.  I have also posted a link to another presentation I gave at the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in February. This earlier one is exclusively about the issues with standard game preservation. If you are unfamiliar with this whole topic, definitely check it out.

TLDR; The current preservation practices we use for games and software need to be significantly reconsidered when taking into account the current conditions of modern computer games. Below I elaborate on the standard model of game preservation, and what I’m referring to as “network-contingent” experiences. These network-contingent games are now the predominant form of the medium and add significant complexity to the task of preserving the “playable” historical record. Unless there is a general awareness of this problem with the future of history, we might lose a lot more than anyone is expecting. Furthermore, we are already in the midst of this issue, and I think we need to stop pushing off a larger discussion of it.

The standard model of game preservation

Any preservation activity must first decide on its scope, on the boundaries of what it considers to be worthy of saving, and on the basic definitions for the objects involved. In game preservation, the standard model for most (not all, as mentioned below) of the work I’ve been involved in resembles the image below.

Screen Shot 2016-06-06 at 12.41.08 Read More »

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Two more faculty jobs at UC Santa Cruz

UC Santa Cruz has two more faculty jobs in games and computational media. One is an Assistant Professor in game design (apply by February 1st) and the other is a Teaching Professor position in computational media available for applicants at any level of seniority, and open to a wide range of specialties (apply by February 23rd).

The game design position is for one of the founding faculty of the new BA in Art & Design: Games & Playable Media. The ideal applicant is a designer with experience pushing games in new directions, working with innovative design and technology approaches. This position is in the Arts division.

The Teaching Professor position is a bit unusual, so some explanation may help. This position has a higher teaching load than is normal in our School of Engineering (more akin to arts and humanities teaching expectations). It also means that the faculty member’s professional activity does not need to be what is normally expected in engineering — it could focus on game making, or software studies, or generative artwork, or many other practices. The person in this position will be a full member of the UCSC academic senate, will have full voting rights in the Computational Media department, and will have security of employment like traditional faculty. Letters of reference must be received by February 23rd, so if you’re interested it’s time to start the wheels in motion.

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Four Jobs at UC Santa Cruz

UCSC logo

I’m happy to announce that UC Santa Cruz is currently searching for four jobs in areas of computational media (and we expect to announce two more soon). Two of the currently-advertised positions are in Engineering and two are in Arts. Read More »

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Seeking Program Director for Professional Games MS

UCSC logo

Interested in working on innovative games, with passionate people, in an academic position in Silicon Valley?

We’re seeking a leader for the UC Santa Cruz professional MS in Games and Playable Media. The MS is offered through our Silicon Valley campus, now expanding into a new building (with about 5000 sq ft dedicated to the program) and in active planning to shift to a two year program.

The position will include working both with our current game faculty and with new personnel hired specifically for the program. The degree is focused on expanding the possibilities for games — and on helping students build the skills and connections they need for what they want to do next.

Application review begins July 17th, and much more information is in the official flier.

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Curing Games’ Amnesia with NLP

GameSage

Video game playing is plagued by amnesia. One reason is that there are no good tools for finding related video games across time. Everything is focused on the present or future. Yet if you are fascinated by a certain game, the best next games to investigate are not necessarily the other ones featured in Amazon’s “bought together” display.

All that is about to change. Today UC Santa Cruz is introducing two new, free web tools that use natural language processing to help people find related games. One tool, GameNet, is a network of 12,000 games, connected based on their relatedness. GameNet doesn’t use a simple idea of relatedness, like genre, but rather one derived from analyzing the full text of the Wikipedia entries for these games. The other tool, GameSage, allows you to describe a hypothetical game (using any words you like) and find its location in GameNet — something no previous tool has provided. Read More »

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